Metro Trains find thin flanges on their wheels.

It’s not just a V-Line problem!

The latest report is that Metro has decided to check for thin flanges on their wheels also. Whether it was their own initiative or forced upon them by the State Government is unknown.

According to sources, train ‘fitters’ have been doing quick ‘roll by’ inspections of Belgrave trains as they pass by the Bayswater train maintenance facility.

image

They have reportedly found ‘some’ (number unspecified) with dangerously worn flanges.

If the fitters can spot them from a distance it could be assumed that they are pretty bad.

New Update:

QUBE “SQEF 80” wagons on the Maryvale are showing Arris conditions on ALL WHEELS facing Flinders Street (Left Side) when travelling away from Flinders Street.

ALL WHEELS.  (That’s 100 wheels on the 25 wagon consist.  Up to 1.8mm.)

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Mild panic is reportedly brewing

The operators appear to be ignoring maintenance in favour of money.

Public Transport Victoria is meant to be ensuring that they maintain to a safe standard, but don’t appear to be doing their job either.

Everyone is looking to the Minister for Transport Jacinta Allen wondering when she is going to do ‘something’.

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9 comments

  1. Peter Murray

    Karma is an amazing thing. Soft wheels, under-cured concrete sleepers etc. The flanges are not designed to make regular (or possibly constant) contact with the railhead. The wheels are meant to be lathed to a conical profile to act like a motor vehicle differential on a curve.

    I wonder if the wheel treads have worn flat?

    Given Metro’s “asset-sweating” policy, I would not be surprised if they have skipped wheel lathe cycles. V/Line too.

    As ye sow, so shall ye reap!

    Like

    • Josh

      Even looking at this picture by eye, I’d say you’re correct Peter – the expected conical profile looks like it’s quite gone.

      Like

  2. Informed Source

    In relation to the Maryvale train your source appears to be mis-informed.
    SQEF wagons being 25.7m long have since their introduction always had arris issues.
    A tight radius curve on the ARTC network at ‘W Track’ has always been believed to be the issue.
    Furthermore a 1.8mm arris is a red card. The wagons were recently reported, and inspected by Qube’s maintenance contractor with a maximum measured arris of 0.8mm. They were cleared to run until their next scheduled inspection.

    Like

  3. informed Source

    In relation to the Maryvale train your source appears to be mis-informed.
    SQEF wagons being 25.7m long have since their introduction always had arris issues.
    A tight radius curve on the ARTC network at ‘W Track’ has always been believed to be the cause.
    Furthermore a 1.8mm arris is a red card. Some (but not all) wagons were recently reported, and inspected by Qube’s maintenance contractor with a maximum measured arris of 0.8mm. They were cleared to run until their next scheduled inspection.

    Like

  4. Les Brown

    The wheel profile doesn’t look too good either. Would having a concave profile not push the wheel to one side of the track or the other and increases wear on the flange even on straight track?
    This reminds me of the good ‘ol VR days in the mid-1960s when panic ensued because of the number of 4-wheel wagon derailments that occurred to due worn and faulty “W” guards.
    The more things change……..

    Like

  5. Pingback: Metro derailment: what goes around runs aground | William PJ Kulich

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